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Hazon Educational Library

Curricula, sourcebooks, and other educational resources from and for the field of Jewish Outdoor, Food, Farming & Environmental Education

This open source collection includes resources produced by individuals and organizations throughout the JOFEE field. >Our Educational Library, like our community, celebrates the diversity of religious observance and thought and we make every effort to accommodate the breadth and diversity of the Jewish community in our programs and curricula. We hope you will take and use what is appropriate for you and invite others to do the same.

While this resource will continue to grow and evolve, it currently includes:

  •  Hazon’s online educational resources (forthcoming)
  •  Curricula produced by JOFEE Fellows during their Fellowship year
  •  Curricula and resources shared from partner JOFEE organizations

All materials are available for free download. Most are available for use and adaptation under creative commons license. Please cite authors and organizations on any materials used or adapted from these resources.

Use the filters in the bar below to narrow your search.

Food Justice Shabbat Dinner

by Michael Fraade
Jewish Community of Louisville
This program brought members of the Jewish community together for a Shabbat dinner that highlighted local and ethically sourced ingredients while educating participants about issues of food justice in our city. The dinner included sharing stories, discussion questions, and conversations about ways to help promote equal food access. We partnered with a local food justice nonprofit to help facilitate the discussion and publicize upcoming partnerships between their organization and the JCC.
Age(s):

Staff Training Sessions on Group Management, Questioning Strategies, and Blending Jewish and Scientific Learning

by Bailey Lininger
Tamarack Camps
These staff training sessions focus on essential skills for the educators that work at Tamarack Camps during our Outdoor Education seasons: facilitating meaningful discussions with students, and managing groups of a variety of sizes, especially large groups (which we consider to be over 30).
Age(s):

The Three Sisters in Kehilla: The Power of Teamwork

by Anika Rice
Urban Adamah
This lesson makes a connection between how both plants and people live in community. On the farm, plants and other organisms are giving and receiving help from one another all of the time. This is reciprocity. Companion planting is the technique of sowing two crops together for a specific purpose, often pest control, space use or yield maximization. Native Americans have been planting the Three Sisters (corn, beans and squash) in one plot for generations. Not only does this trio help each other grow and use nutrients efficiently, but they have higher yields when planted together, and form a nutritious diet. People also need each other: to learn, to pray and to live a spiritual life. When we work in chevruta (learning partners) or are part of a minyan (prayer group), everyone involved can benefit from the group. We are individuals, but our communities are greater than the sum of their parts.

The ECO Passover connection

by Mira Menyuk
Pearlstone Center
This program connects children to the modern day issues of environmental plagues through an in depth look at text describing the plagues in the passover story, while also getting to appreciate the wonder of animals in a healthy eco-system through observation and touch. We will also touch on the subject of Matzah by discussing the significance of eating a bread that does not rise while making our own pita.

Torah Theater: Ancestral Wisdom in the Wilderness

by Becca Heisler
Wilderness Torah
This program draws from the strength of our ancestors and the robustness of Jewish tradition, while preparing for a wilderness challenge.

Shabbat: Earth-Based Technology for Young Adults in Silicon Valley

by Sofia Marbach
Wilderness Torah
This is designed as a one evening program that frames Shabbos as an earth-based technology of connection. This collective welcoming of Shabbat is designed for young adults ages 22-39 across the spectrum of religious observance (Jewish and non-Jewish alike). This 45 minute program is crafted to lead into Shabbat dinner or another gathering and can function both as a basic introduction to Shabbat practice for those for whom it is new, and a new earth-based framework for those already at home in Shabbat ritual. Also note this program is designed based on the 8 Shields model.
Age(s):

Hiking Through the Sefirot

by Jacob Weiss
Isabella Freedman
This will be a meditative and metaphorical journey that will invite participants to explore the seven sefirot (emanations of god) which correlate to the seven weeks of counting the omer from Passover to Shavout.

Havdallah Candle Making

by Danielle Smith
Eden Village Camp
This program is an introduction to Havdallah and DIY candle making. Participants will learn about a Havdallah candle and leave with their own candle. Students will leave with an understanding of what renewable resources are.
Age(s):

Bringing The Stones’ into the 21st Century

by Nicole Cruz
Peninsula JCC
'The Stones' text, from Talmud Bavli, Masekhet Bava Kama 50b, brings its readers back to ancient times. However, the lessons that can be learned from this text transcend time. In this program, participants will delve deep into 'The Stones' text, making connections relevant to today's world. Through this discussion, participants will discover what defines a community, and how in order to make an impact in a community, we must find a balance between protecting the Earth and meeting our own personal needs.
Age(s):

Gratitude: God, Heschel, and Neruda

by Henry Schmidt
Shalom Institute
An hour-long program designed to explorer Heschel's philosophy of Radical Amazement. It is a lower-energy, discussion-based program that benefits from a garden or similarly beautiful location.

Peah Forward

by Rebecca Remis
Eden Village West
Learn about and enact the value of peah through harvesting a delicious summer treat and decide how much to donate. Share the remaining bounty with the camp community. Experience the joy in working hard and sharing the abundance (through recognition in the dining hall, working with a community organization, and leaving camp for a field trip)

Pickling and Food Justice

by Rachel Aronson
Hazon
This program provides an introduction to pickling and an overview of food justice issues. Participants will leave with a jar of pickles and knowledge of the pickling process, and with deeper insight into the importance of local food and workers' rights in the food system.

Turn, Turn, Turn: A Jewish Calendar Garden Mosaic

by Anika Rice
Urban Adamah
Any Jewish farm, school, community center or garden can use this document to either create a calendar garden with the community or to lead interactive educational programs that situate the holiday and season in Jewish cycles of time. This document gives an overview of the mosaic design process. It does not give detailed instructions for mosaics; seek this out elsewhere if you are not familiar with outdoor mosaics.

Havdallah garden training workshop for early childhood educators

by Becky Adelberg
JCC Chicago
This program is an introduction to greening in early childhood classrooms through teaching about the Jewish ritual of havdalah.
Age(s):

Peace Be the Feathers

by Miki Levran
Pearlstone Center
This activity allows students to get a hands-on experience with real feathers and practice using them creatively while thinking about an important Jewish and worldly symbol.
Age(s):