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Educational Resource Library: food justice

Young Adult Tu B’Shvat Seder

by Josh Kleymer
Mayerson JCC of Cincinnati
A Tu B'Svhat Seder is a fun experiential way to connect to a little known Jewish holiday, bringing to life ecological teachings, enjoying fruit from around the world, drinking good wine and of course fostering social connections. This year, with the help of the JCC Rabbi, the Mayerson JCC hosted their first Tu B'Svhat Seder for Young Adults.
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Tu B’Shvat Seder

by Michael Fraade
Jewish Community of Louisville
This program celebrates the holiday of Tu B'Svhat and includes both traditional rituals and modern connections to environmentalism and eco-friendly Jewish practice. The seder takes place as a full multi-course dinner, incorporating the four traditional types of fruit into four courses. Between each set of courses is a relevant activity or discussion, including a keynote panel with representatives from local environmental nonprofits.
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Pickling and Food Justice

by Rachel Aronson
Hazon
This program provides an introduction to pickling and an overview of food justice issues. Participants will leave with a jar of pickles and knowledge of the pickling process, and with deeper insight into the importance of local food and workers' rights in the food system.

Peah Forward

by Rebecca Remis
Eden Village West
Learn about and enact the value of peah through harvesting a delicious summer treat and decide how much to donate. Share the remaining bounty with the camp community. Experience the joy in working hard and sharing the abundance (through recognition in the dining hall, working with a community organization, and leaving camp for a field trip)

Jewish Food Justice Around the Farm

by Rachel Binstock
Urban Adamah
This program is an introduction to Jewish agricultural law. Pairing them with sustainable agriculture projects offers a taste of what it might have been like for our ancestors to follow these laws. Participants will have the opportunity to farm in small groups and to learn how many of our earth based laws also help us help our communities today.
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Food Justice Shabbat Dinner

by Michael Fraade
Jewish Community of Louisville
This program brought members of the Jewish community together for a Shabbat dinner that highlighted local and ethically sourced ingredients while educating participants about issues of food justice in our city. The dinner included sharing stories, discussion questions, and conversations about ways to help promote equal food access. We partnered with a local food justice nonprofit to help facilitate the discussion and publicize upcoming partnerships between their organization and the JCC.
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Farm to Friday Nosh:pitality Shabbat

by Amanda Herring
OneTable
Shabbat is a time to sit and enjoy good food and good company, sourcing your food intentionally can bring a new level of mindful gratitude to your dinner table. It can also be delicious and filling! Shabbat rituals can be adapted to be relevant to your life, and the season. Local urban farms are doing amazing work in the D.C. area and our Jewish values teach us to support their work in any way we can. You can replicate this celebration at your Shabbats by thinking sustainably and seasonally, and reaching out to local farms.
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