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Educational Resource Library: Jewish Food traditions

Young Adult Tu B’Shvat Seder

by Josh Kleymer
Mayerson JCC of Cincinnati
A Tu B'Svhat Seder is a fun experiential way to connect to a little known Jewish holiday, bringing to life ecological teachings, enjoying fruit from around the world, drinking good wine and of course fostering social connections. This year, with the help of the JCC Rabbi, the Mayerson JCC hosted their first Tu B'Svhat Seder for Young Adults.
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Tu B’Shvat Seder

by Michael Fraade
Jewish Community of Louisville
This program celebrates the holiday of Tu B'Svhat and includes both traditional rituals and modern connections to environmentalism and eco-friendly Jewish practice. The seder takes place as a full multi-course dinner, incorporating the four traditional types of fruit into four courses. Between each set of courses is a relevant activity or discussion, including a keynote panel with representatives from local environmental nonprofits.
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Tu B’Shvat Seder for JCC Staff

by Nicole Cruz
Peninsula JCC
Celebrate Tu B'Svhat, the Jewish New Year of the Trees, at our PJCC staff Lunch & Learn. In honor of this year's Tu B'Svhat, we will be learning more about our relationship with nature through a Tu B'Svhat seder. The seder is divided into four sections, each representing one of the four worlds of Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism. Join us as we explore each of these worlds through traditional Jewish fruits and nuts, ?wine' (aka grape juice), activities and more! Bring your lunch and learn more about the Jewish New Year of Trees in this engaging seder.
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Tu B’Shvat Youth Seders

by Daniella Aboody
Wilderness Torah
In the tradition of the Kabbalists (16th century mystics of Tsfat, Israel), we gather in the forest to create an experiential Tu B'Shvat seder (ceremony) that connects us to the trees and the elements, and we are taken on a journey from the physical world to the spiritual world. This oral tradition within Judaism encourages us to open ourselves to the mystery, wonder and creativity that this time of renewal and rebirth brings. During the seder, we delight in experiencing and tasting of p'ri ha-etz (the fruit of the trees) and celebrate the season together through the five senses, movement, mindfulness, ritual, and Tu B'Shvat teachings.

Tu B’Shvat Family Nature Hike

by Jared Kaminsky
Shoresh
This program is an opportunity for families to celebrate Tu B'Shvat through learning about local ecology, connecting to nature, and understanding the essence of this Jewish holiday on a community hike.
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The ECO Passover connection

by Mira Minyuk
Pearlstone Center
This program connects children to the modern day issues of environmental plagues through an in depth look at text describing the plagues in the passover story, while also getting to appreciate the wonder of animals in a healthy eco-system through observation and touch. We will also touch on the subject of Matzah by discussing the significance of eating a bread that does not rise while making our own pita.

Shabbat: Earth-Based Technology for Young Adults in Silicon Valley

by Sofia Marbach
Wilderness Torah
This is designed as a one evening program that frames Shabbos as an earth-based technology of connection. This collective welcoming of Shabbat is designed for young adults ages 22-39 across the spectrum of religious observance (Jewish and non-Jewish alike). This 45 minute program is crafted to lead into Shabbat dinner or another gathering and can function both as a basic introduction to Shabbat practice for those for whom it is new, and a new earth-based framework for those already at home in Shabbat ritual. Also note this program is designed based on the 8 Shields model.
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Rosh Hashanah Honeybees

by Josh Kleymer
Mayerson JCC of Cincinnati
Using Rosh Hashanah as a springboard, the children will learn about bees and how they make honey. They will participate in a hide and seek type game before a wrap up discussion and honey taste test.

Seed Stories

by Brenden Jackson
Amir / Shalom Farm Houston
This program uses storytelling as an introduction into the importance of seeds and the connections foods play to different people and cultures. Participants will have the opportunity to connect with a specific seed/plant and learn how plants and the foods created from them, can act as a living conduits for these stories. It is also an opportunity for participants to see the connection between their Judaism and a specific plant/food, or create their own new and important connection. Lastly, using seed stories as a framework within the garden offers the opportunity to create a sense of connection and continuity between multiple groups of campers.

Pickle Clowns

by Alex Voynow
Jewish Farm School
A pickling workshop taught with the magic of clowning pedagogy!

Pickling and Fermentation Workshop for Families

by Nicole Cruz
Peninsula JCC
Explore new ways to preserve and eat seasonal food with your children in this easy and fun hands-on workshop. Learn about the history of pickling and its connections to Jewish traditions. In this workshop, we will create two different types of pickles- a 'quick' pickle using vinegar and a fermented pickle that you can take home to watch develop.
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Pickling and Food Justice

by Rachel Aronson
Hazon
This program provides an introduction to pickling and an overview of food justice issues. Participants will leave with a jar of pickles and knowledge of the pickling process, and with deeper insight into the importance of local food and workers' rights in the food system.

Naamah and the Plants

by Rebecca Remis
Eden Village West
Before the flood while Noah was readying the animals, a midrash says his wife Naamah was collecting seeds and plants. Through this lens, we'll explore plant life cycles, seed saving, and Jewish ideas of sustainability.

License to Grill – Nosh:pitality

by Amanda Herring
OneTable
This program is an interactive grilling lesson connected to the celebration of Lag B'Omer. Participants will have the opportunity to make several seasonal salads, learn about grilling methods and outdoor cooking, and learn what Lag B'Omer is in relation to the counting of the Omer and the Jewish Calendar.

Make-Your-Own-Gelt: Chocolate-making from Scratch

by Alex Voynow
Jewish Farm School
This program is an informational and hands-on dive into artisanal/DIY chocolate making. Participants will learn all of the steps in the process--from how cacao trees were first cultivated in ancient mesoamerica, to how to wrap their gelt in foil. Taste, touch, history, mysticism, and science are all called upon to make coherent the relationship between chocolate, ecology, and Judaism.