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Educational Resource Library: farm and garden

Understanding Pollinators

by Henry Schmidt
Shalom Institute
Understanding pollinators is an hour-long educational program that teaches about the importance of pollinators in our habitat. This program uses honeybees as a ?gateway pollinator? to teach not only the wonder of honeybees but also that their story is part of a much larger ecological phenomenon.

We are Shepherds like our Fathers Before Us (Meet the Goats)

by Rebecca Remis
Eden Village West
Through this activity, campers will be able to walk goats to pasture, learn a melody to Psalm 23, and relate shepherding goats to shepherding humans (through social norms).

The Three Sisters in Kehilla: The Power of Teamwork

by Anika Rice
Urban Adamah
This lesson makes a connection between how both plants and people live in community. On the farm, plants and other organisms are giving and receiving help from one another all of the time. This is reciprocity. Companion planting is the technique of sowing two crops together for a specific purpose, often pest control, space use or yield maximization. Native Americans have been planting the Three Sisters (corn, beans and squash) in one plot for generations. Not only does this trio help each other grow and use nutrients efficiently, but they have higher yields when planted together, and form a nutritious diet. People also need each other: to learn, to pray and to live a spiritual life. When we work in chevruta (learning partners) or are part of a minyan (prayer group), everyone involved can benefit from the group. We are individuals, but our communities are greater than the sum of their parts.

Sukkot Harvest Festival DC

by Amanda Herring (OneTable), Mollie Sharfman (GatherDC), Elizabeth Heyman (Jews United for Justice)
Urban Adamah
Experience Sukkot as a celebration of the seasonal harvest while in an urban setting! Join us on an urban farm in downtown D.C. to celebrate the season's bounty with hands-on workshops and a farm-to-Sukkah feast grounded in the themes of the agricultural harvest festival. We invite you to end your week by taking a pause from the busyness of the city to connect with nature and eat from the harvest at Common Good City Farm. From a pickling lesson to tasting local seasonal ciders, we will come together and celebrate abundance both on the farm and in our lives.
Age(s):

Rosh Hashanah Honeybees

by Josh Kleymer
Mayerson JCC of Cincinnati
Using Rosh Hashanah as a springboard, the children will learn about bees and how they make honey. They will participate in a hide and seek type game before a wrap up discussion and honey taste test.

Seed Stories

by Brenden Jackson
Amir / Shalom Farm Houston
This program uses storytelling as an introduction into the importance of seeds and the connections foods play to different people and cultures. Participants will have the opportunity to connect with a specific seed/plant and learn how plants and the foods created from them, can act as a living conduits for these stories. It is also an opportunity for participants to see the connection between their Judaism and a specific plant/food, or create their own new and important connection. Lastly, using seed stories as a framework within the garden offers the opportunity to create a sense of connection and continuity between multiple groups of campers.

Philly Farm Crew Text Study

by Liora Lebowitz
Jewish Farm School
This program is to engage with both Jewish and non-Jewish environmentally themed texts after having had the experience of working on a farm. This is a discussion based program where conversations happened both in pairs and as an entire group to think about the texts presented.
Age(s):

Mindfulness Nature Walk

by Jared Kaminsky
Shoresh
This program will help participants develop their ability to be more mindful and aware drawing on Jewish teachings while in nature. Partcipants will learn how to approach the natural world from a place of curiosity, and awarness helping to improve themselves and the planet.
Age(s):

Naamah and the Plants

by Rebecca Remis
Eden Village West
Before the flood while Noah was readying the animals, a midrash says his wife Naamah was collecting seeds and plants. Through this lens, we'll explore plant life cycles, seed saving, and Jewish ideas of sustainability.

Peah Forward

by Rebecca Remis
Eden Village West
Learn about and enact the value of peah through harvesting a delicious summer treat and decide how much to donate. Share the remaining bounty with the camp community. Experience the joy in working hard and sharing the abundance (through recognition in the dining hall, working with a community organization, and leaving camp for a field trip)

Jewish Food Justice Around the Farm

by Rachel Binstock
Urban Adamah
This program is an introduction to Jewish agricultural law. Pairing them with sustainable agriculture projects offers a taste of what it might have been like for our ancestors to follow these laws. Participants will have the opportunity to farm in small groups and to learn how many of our earth based laws also help us help our communities today.
Age(s):

Gratitude: God, Heschel, and Neruda

by Henry Schmidt
Shalom Institute
An hour-long program designed to explorer Heschel's philosophy of Radical Amazement. It is a lower-energy, discussion-based program that benefits from a garden or similarly beautiful location.

Havdallah garden training workshop for early childhood educators

by Becky Adelberg
JCC Chicago
This program is an introduction to greening in early childhood classrooms through teaching about the Jewish ritual of havdalah.
Age(s):

Farmer Michael’s Wagon Garden

by Michael Fraade
Jewish Community of Louisville
Children planted seeds in a soil-filled wagon, which could easily be transported from classroom to classroom, and watched them grow over the course of four weeks. The culmination of the program was to bring the children and wagon out to the J's main garden to see how their plants fit into a larger picture and to allow them to sample many of the things they helped grow. The program also touched on topics such as where food comes from, Hebrew vocabulary, composting, using the five senses, and making observations.

Divine Dyeing: How to harness the holiness of color through natural dyeing

by Mira Minyuk
Pearlstone Center
This program is an interactive color exploration through natural dyeing. Participants will learn about the symbolism and holiness associated with certain colors in Judaism, specifically the blue of tekhelet that is found in Tzitzit. They will also learn how to harvest and use different parts of plants to create their own dye and take home a self-dyed bookmark.