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Hazon Educational Library: community

Fit to Eat

by Alli Rosen and Liz Traison
Hazon
This guide provides a framework for Jewish institutions to learn more about our food system and Jewish traditions surrounding food justice; to identify challenges specific to your local community; and to create a plan for action that builds on the existing programs, skills, and assets of your Jewish institution.
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Day of Awe-some: A Rosh Hashanah Family Program

by Darya Watnick
Edlavitch DC JCC
This program is an opportunity for families with young children to engage in the Jewish rituals and traditions surrounding the holiday of Rosh Hashanah. They will be able to meet families like themselves while spending the morning creating a meaningful and educational connection with a Jewish holiday.

?Bringing ?The Stones? into the 21st Century

by Nicole Cruz
Peninsula JCC
?The Stones? text, from Talmud Bavli, Masekhet Bava Kama 50b, brings its readers back to ancient times. However, the lessons that can be learned from this text transcend time. In this program, participants will delve deep into ?The Stones? text, making connections relevant to today?s world. Through this discussion, participants will discover what defines a community, and how in order to make an impact in a community, we must find a balance between protecting the Earth and meeting our own personal needs.
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The Three Sisters in Kehilla: The Power of Teamwork

by Anika Rice
Urban Adamah
This lesson makes a connection between how both plants and people live in community. On the farm, plants and other organisms are giving and receiving help from one another all of the time. This is reciprocity. Companion planting is the technique of sowing two crops together for a specific purpose, often pest control, space use or yield maximization. Native Americans have been planting the Three Sisters (corn, beans and squash) in one plot for generations. Not only does this trio help each other grow and use nutrients efficiently, but they have higher yields when planted together, and form a nutritious diet. People also need each other: to learn, to pray and to live a spiritual life. When we work in chevruta (learning partners) or are part of a minyan (prayer group), everyone involved can benefit from the group. We are individuals, but our communities are greater than the sum of their parts.

Shabbat: Earth-Based Technology for Young Adults in Silicon Valley

by Sofia Marbach
Wilderness Torah
This is designed as a one evening program that frames Shabbos as an earth-based technology of connection. This collective welcoming of Shabbat is designed for young adults ages 22-39 across the spectrum of religious observance (Jewish and non-Jewish alike). This 45 minute program is crafted to lead into Shabbat dinner or another gathering and can function both as a basic introduction to Shabbat practice for those for whom it is new, and a new earth-based framework for those already at home in Shabbat ritual. Also note this program is designed based on the 8 Shields model.
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Wild and Wonderful Worms

by Brenden Jackson
Amir / Shalom Farm Houston
This program uses worms to explore how all of G-d's creatures work together to create a functioning garden/society/world. Participants will get the chance to explore the diverse ecosystem of healthy soil, specifically worms, and how it is because of this diversity that our garden can thrive. Students will also draw connections to their own differences between classmates, other community members, etc to see how all folks have a role to play creating a happy world. Using a simple prayer, participants will be able to connect how a praise to G-d for ?varied creatures? can apply to both humans and animals/insects.

Sukkot Harvest Festival DC

by Amanda Herring (OneTable), Mollie Sharfman (GatherDC), Elizabeth Heyman (Jews United for Justice)
Amir / Shalom Farm Houston
Experience Sukkot as a celebration of the seasonal harvest while in an urban setting! Join us on an urban farm in downtown D.C. to celebrate the season's bounty with hands-on workshops and a farm-to-Sukkah feast grounded in the themes of the agricultural harvest festival. We invite you to end your week by taking a pause from the busyness of the city to connect with nature and eat from the harvest at Common Good City Farm. From a pickling lesson to tasting local seasonal ciders, we will come together and celebrate abundance both on the farm and in our lives.
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