fbpx

Educational Resource Library: Sustainability

Worms: An Exploration of Earthworms

by Sarah Rovin and Shani Mink
Pearlstone Center
This program is an introduction to earthworms and their necessary place in decomposition and soil health as well as looking deeper into cycles that renew the earth and where we see this in Jewish text.

Weaving Community

by Ashley Davenport
Abundance Farm / Gan Keshet Preschool
Traditionally, weaving has deep roots in the Jewish culture. The craft of weaving is one of the 39 crafts that the Jewish people used to create the Mishkan (tabernacle) in the desert. Weaving, and many of the actions associated with weaving are mentioned specifically in the 39 Melachot, the list of labor forbidden on Shabbat. Although many of the traditional Jewish weaving techniques have been lost to exile, modern day ritual objects are often still made from woven materials, including challah covers, kippot and tallis. Looking back, history shows us that the nomadic Israelites used what fibers they had on hand, such as camel, goat, and sheep, to create their clothing and dwellings. These ancestral methods were simple. Using this simplicity as inspiration, the loom for this project is crafted from sturdy cardboard, the warp is made using cotton string, and the weft consists of long pieces of recycled fabric. Simplicity is often key in introducing new textile art projects to preschool age children. These projects are multifaceted and engaging to young minds, integrating core skill sets such as language and literacy development through oral storytelling, problem solving, pattern recognition, and fine motor development.

What They Breath Out, We Breathe In: Photosynthesis, Respiration, and Jewish Theology

by Frances Lasday
Hazon - Teva
This activity aims to give educators a thorough understanding of photosynthesis, respiration, and the carbon cycle so that they will feel more comfortable teaching it to their students. Educators will also consider how Jewish theology can relate to and inform the ways that we think and teach about this topic in Jewish settings. This session was developed specifically as part of a series of science intensives for Teva educator training 2018.
Age(s):

Understanding Pollinators

by Henry Schmidt
Shalom Institute
Understanding pollinators is an hour-long educational program that teaches about the importance of pollinators in our habitat. This program uses honeybees as a ?gateway pollinator? to teach not only the wonder of honeybees but also that their story is part of a much larger ecological phenomenon.

Topsy Turvy Bus

by Emily Glick
Hazon - Teva
The Topsy Turvy Bus facilitates rethinking the current, nonrenewable, and often damaging systems of the world we live in. This summer's theme was focused on water usage and conservation. Through hands on activities, the programs aims for participants to understand how we can keep our resources in the cycle. Specifically, this curriculum touches upon the carbon cycle, the soil cycle, and the water cycle. This station was one stop on a 4 station rotation.
Age(s):

Stone Wall

by Eli Goldstein
Bridgewater JCC
This program is a physically active introduction to The Stones text from the Talmud Bavli, Masekbet Bava Kama, which raises many questions about land, responsibility, and ownership using text and soccer cones.
Age(s):

Shabbat, Melachot, and Challah-cover making

by Rachel Aronson
Hazon
This lesson introduces students to traditional Jewish understandings of work and rest. They will understand that ?work? traditionally meant interacting with the environment, and the connection between melachot and shabbat. They will also create challah covers and learn about Shabbat symbols like challah and challah covers.

Shabbat: Earth-Based Technology for Young Adults in Silicon Valley

by Sofia Marbach
Wilderness Torah
This is designed as a one evening program that frames Shabbos as an earth-based technology of connection. This collective welcoming of Shabbat is designed for young adults ages 22-39 across the spectrum of religious observance (Jewish and non-Jewish alike). This 45 minute program is crafted to lead into Shabbat dinner or another gathering and can function both as a basic introduction to Shabbat practice for those for whom it is new, and a new earth-based framework for those already at home in Shabbat ritual. Also note this program is designed based on the 8 Shields model.
Age(s):

Seed Stories

by Brenden Jackson
Amir / Shalom Farm Houston
This program uses storytelling as an introduction into the importance of seeds and the connections foods play to different people and cultures. Participants will have the opportunity to connect with a specific seed/plant and learn how plants and the foods created from them, can act as a living conduits for these stories. It is also an opportunity for participants to see the connection between their Judaism and a specific plant/food, or create their own new and important connection. Lastly, using seed stories as a framework within the garden offers the opportunity to create a sense of connection and continuity between multiple groups of campers.

Pickling and Food Justice

by Rachel Aronson
Hazon
This program provides an introduction to pickling and an overview of food justice issues. Participants will leave with a jar of pickles and knowledge of the pickling process, and with deeper insight into the importance of local food and workers' rights in the food system.

Naamah and the Plants

by Rebecca Remis
Eden Village West
Before the flood while Noah was readying the animals, a midrash says his wife Naamah was collecting seeds and plants. Through this lens, we'll explore plant life cycles, seed saving, and Jewish ideas of sustainability.

Mindfulness Nature Walk

by Jared Kaminsky
Shoresh
This program will help participants develop their ability to be more mindful and aware drawing on Jewish teachings while in nature. Partcipants will learn how to approach the natural world from a place of curiosity, and awarness helping to improve themselves and the planet.
Age(s):

Inclusivity: an Exploratory Conversation for JOFEE Organizations

by Sofia Marbach
Wilderness Torah
Although most JOFEE (Jewish Outdoor, Food, Farm, and Environmental Education) organizations weren't born of a mission to tackle them head on, we encounter questions of social justice in our work every day. While our programs may be boiled down into descriptors like ?outdoor education,? ?pickling workshop,? or ?holiday retreat,? JOFEE organizations exist within a broader world of Judaism, human socialization, and all their globalized complexities.
Age(s):

Havdallah Candle Making

by Danielle Smith
Eden Village Camp
This program is an introduction to Havdallah and DIY candle making. Participants will learn about a Havdallah candle and leave with their own candle. Students will leave with an understanding of what renewable resources are.
Age(s):

Holy Compost! Sacred cycles of rest and work

by Ze'ev Gebler
Pearlstone Center
This program combines a group walk to compost piles, and a look at vermicomposting bins, with a conversation about the Jewish value of distinguishing between rest and work. Participants will engage in text study and discuss the relationship between adding intention to our time with Shabbat, and adding intention to our space with the placement of compost.