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Hazon Educational Library: young adults

Food for Thought

by Nigel Savage and Anna Hanau
Hazon
Food for Thought is is a 130-page sourcebook that draws on a range of texts from within and beyond Jewish traditions to explore a range of topics relating to Jews and food. Food for Thought is designed to encourage participants to think critically about the food that they eat and the ways their food choices affect the health of their community and the planet.

Shabbat: Earth-Based Technology for Young Adults in Silicon Valley

by Sofia Marbach
Wilderness Torah
This is designed as a one evening program that frames Shabbos as an earth-based technology of connection. This collective welcoming of Shabbat is designed for young adults ages 22-39 across the spectrum of religious observance (Jewish and non-Jewish alike). This 45 minute program is crafted to lead into Shabbat dinner or another gathering and can function both as a basic introduction to Shabbat practice for those for whom it is new, and a new earth-based framework for those already at home in Shabbat ritual. Also note this program is designed based on the 8 Shields model.
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Sukkot Harvest Festival DC

by Amanda Herring (OneTable), Mollie Sharfman (GatherDC), Elizabeth Heyman (Jews United for Justice)
Wilderness Torah
Experience Sukkot as a celebration of the seasonal harvest while in an urban setting! Join us on an urban farm in downtown D.C. to celebrate the season's bounty with hands-on workshops and a farm-to-Sukkah feast grounded in the themes of the agricultural harvest festival. We invite you to end your week by taking a pause from the busyness of the city to connect with nature and eat from the harvest at Common Good City Farm. From a pickling lesson to tasting local seasonal ciders, we will come together and celebrate abundance both on the farm and in our lives.
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Farm to Friday Nosh:pitality Shabbat

by Amanda Herring
OneTable
Shabbat is a time to sit and enjoy good food and good company, sourcing your food intentionally can bring a new level of mindful gratitude to your dinner table. It can also be delicious and filling! Shabbat rituals can be adapted to be relevant to your life, and the season. Local urban farms are doing amazing work in the D.C. area and our Jewish values teach us to support their work in any way we can. You can replicate this celebration at your Shabbats by thinking sustainably and seasonally, and reaching out to local farms.
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