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Educational Resource Library

Welcome to the Hazon resource library

This collection includes educational materials produced by Hazon as well as over one hundred curricula developed by the participants in Hazon's JOFEE Fellows program.

Use the filters in the bar below to narrow your search.

Worms: An Exploration of Earthworms

by Sarah Rovin and Shani Mink
Pearlstone Center
This program is an introduction to earthworms and their necessary place in decomposition and soil health as well as looking deeper into cycles that renew the earth and where we see this in Jewish text.

Wilderness Torah’s Passover in the Desert Second-Night Seder Youth Skit: The Four Children Collaborative Performance – Art & Storytelling Around the Fire

by Daniella Aboody
Wilderness Torah
As part of Wilderness Torah's Passover in the Desert festival, for the second-night Passover seder, we are doing an off-the-page co-created celebration around the bonfire! The Passover story will come alive through the brilliant and creative minds of each of member of the village, and be experienced through the ancient art of performative storytelling.

Young Adult Tu B’Shvat Seder

by Josh Kleymer
Mayerson JCC of Cincinnati
A Tu B'Svhat Seder is a fun experiential way to connect to a little known Jewish holiday, bringing to life ecological teachings, enjoying fruit from around the world, drinking good wine and of course fostering social connections. This year, with the help of the JCC Rabbi, the Mayerson JCC hosted their first Tu B'Svhat Seder for Young Adults.
Age(s):

Weaving Community

by Ashley Davenport
Abundance Farm / Gan Keshet Preschool
Traditionally, weaving has deep roots in the Jewish culture. The craft of weaving is one of the 39 crafts that the Jewish people used to create the Mishkan (tabernacle) in the desert. Weaving, and many of the actions associated with weaving are mentioned specifically in the 39 Melachot, the list of labor forbidden on Shabbat. Although many of the traditional Jewish weaving techniques have been lost to exile, modern day ritual objects are often still made from woven materials, including challah covers, kippot and tallis. Looking back, history shows us that the nomadic Israelites used what fibers they had on hand, such as camel, goat, and sheep, to create their clothing and dwellings. These ancestral methods were simple. Using this simplicity as inspiration, the loom for this project is crafted from sturdy cardboard, the warp is made using cotton string, and the weft consists of long pieces of recycled fabric. Simplicity is often key in introducing new textile art projects to preschool age children. These projects are multifaceted and engaging to young minds, integrating core skill sets such as language and literacy development through oral storytelling, problem solving, pattern recognition, and fine motor development.

What They Breath Out, We Breathe In: Photosynthesis, Respiration, and Jewish Theology

by Frances Lasday
Hazon - Teva
This activity aims to give educators a thorough understanding of photosynthesis, respiration, and the carbon cycle so that they will feel more comfortable teaching it to their students. Educators will also consider how Jewish theology can relate to and inform the ways that we think and teach about this topic in Jewish settings. This session was developed specifically as part of a series of science intensives for Teva educator training 2018.
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Wild and Wonderful Worms

by Brenden Jackson
Amir / Shalom Farm Houston
This program uses worms to explore how all of G-d's creatures work together to create a functioning garden/society/world. Participants will get the chance to explore the diverse ecosystem of healthy soil, specifically worms, and how it is because of this diversity that our garden can thrive. Students will also draw connections to their own differences between classmates, other community members, etc to see how all folks have a role to play creating a happy world. Using a simple prayer, participants will be able to connect how a praise to G-d for ?varied creatures? can apply to both humans and animals/insects.

What is Jewish About Cheese? Cheese and butter making workshop

by Emily Glick
Hazon - Teva
This workshop explores the history of dairy in the context of Judaism and Jewish tradition. It teaches participants how to easily make their own cheese and butter (they will leave the session being able to try both), while touching upon the modern-day dairy industry and its relation to Kashrut.
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Tu B’Shvat Seder for JCC Staff

by Nicole Cruz
Peninsula JCC
Celebrate Tu B'Svhat, the Jewish New Year of the Trees, at our PJCC staff Lunch & Learn. In honor of this year's Tu B'Svhat, we will be learning more about our relationship with nature through a Tu B'Svhat seder. The seder is divided into four sections, each representing one of the four worlds of Kabbalah, Jewish mysticism. Join us as we explore each of these worlds through traditional Jewish fruits and nuts, ?wine' (aka grape juice), activities and more! Bring your lunch and learn more about the Jewish New Year of Trees in this engaging seder.
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Tu B’Shvat Seder

by Michael Fraade
Jewish Community of Louisville
This program celebrates the holiday of Tu B'Svhat and includes both traditional rituals and modern connections to environmentalism and eco-friendly Jewish practice. The seder takes place as a full multi-course dinner, incorporating the four traditional types of fruit into four courses. Between each set of courses is a relevant activity or discussion, including a keynote panel with representatives from local environmental nonprofits.
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We are Shepherds like our Fathers Before Us (Meet the Goats)

by Rebecca Remis
Eden Village West
Through this activity, campers will be able to walk goats to pasture, learn a melody to Psalm 23, and relate shepherding goats to shepherding humans (through social norms).

Tu B’Shvat Youth Seders

by Daniella Aboody
Wilderness Torah
In the tradition of the Kabbalists (16th century mystics of Tsfat, Israel), we gather in the forest to create an experiential Tu B'Shvat seder (ceremony) that connects us to the trees and the elements, and we are taken on a journey from the physical world to the spiritual world. This oral tradition within Judaism encourages us to open ourselves to the mystery, wonder and creativity that this time of renewal and rebirth brings. During the seder, we delight in experiencing and tasting of p'ri ha-etz (the fruit of the trees) and celebrate the season together through the five senses, movement, mindfulness, ritual, and Tu B'Shvat teachings.

Understanding Pollinators

by Henry Schmidt
Shalom Institute
Understanding pollinators is an hour-long educational program that teaches about the importance of pollinators in our habitat. This program uses honeybees as a ?gateway pollinator? to teach not only the wonder of honeybees but also that their story is part of a much larger ecological phenomenon.

Topsy Turvy Bus

by Emily Glick
Hazon - Teva
The Topsy Turvy Bus facilitates rethinking the current, nonrenewable, and often damaging systems of the world we live in. This summer's theme was focused on water usage and conservation. Through hands on activities, the programs aims for participants to understand how we can keep our resources in the cycle. Specifically, this curriculum touches upon the carbon cycle, the soil cycle, and the water cycle. This station was one stop on a 4 station rotation.
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Torah Theater: Ancestral Wisdom in the Wilderness

by Becca Heisler
Wilderness Torah
This program draws from the strength of our ancestors and the robustness of Jewish tradition, while preparing for a wilderness challenge.

Tu B’Shvat Family Nature Hike

by Jared Kaminsky
Shoresh
This program is an opportunity for families to celebrate Tu B'Shvat through learning about local ecology, connecting to nature, and understanding the essence of this Jewish holiday on a community hike.
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