fbpx

Hazon Educational Library: Jewish Food traditions

License to Grill – Nosh:pitality

by Amanda Herring
OneTable
This program is an interactive grilling lesson connected to the celebration of Lag B'Omer. Participants will have the opportunity to make several seasonal salads, learn about grilling methods and outdoor cooking, and learn what Lag B'Omer is in relation to the counting of the Omer and the Jewish Calendar.

Bitter Waiting and Sweet Reflection: A Rewarding Exercise in Mindfulness – ‘Crafting a new you: served with homemade apple and honey bitters and a twist of intention.’

by Ryan Kaplan
Jewish Federation of Greater Atlanta
This program will help participants become more mindful and centered through modern ritual, meditation, and the creation of delicious cocktail bitters. Participants will learn how to craft their own apple and honey bitters in time for Rosh Hashanah while simultaneously reflecting on their year and starting anew with meditation and mindfulness.

Rosh Hashanah Honeybees

by Josh Kleymer
Mayerson JCC of Cincinnati
Using Rosh Hashanah as a springboard, the children will learn about bees and how they make honey. They will participate in a hide and seek type game before a wrap up discussion and honey taste test.

Jewish Food Justice Around the Farm

by Rachel Binstock
Urban Adamah
This program is an introduction to Jewish agricultural law. Pairing them with sustainable agriculture projects offers a taste of what it might have been like for our ancestors to follow these laws. Participants will have the opportunity to farm in small groups and to learn how many of our earth based laws also help us help our communities today.
Age(s):

Beyond Horseradish: Exploring Maror

by Rose Cherneff
Abundance Farm
This program helps us explore and expand our relationship to Maror. After learning through a text study that the definition of Maror is different and also more expansive than we might have thought, participants will get to taste and then plant a wide variety of bitter leaves that could grow in their region in time for Passover.

Matzah Making

by Danielle Smith
Eden Village Camp
Students will learn how to make flour from wheat and make matzah from the flour.

Make-Your-Own-Gelt: Chocolate-making from Scratch

by Alex Voynow
Jewish Farm School
This program is an informational and hands-on dive into artisanal/DIY chocolate making. Participants will learn all of the steps in the process--from how cacao trees were first cultivated in ancient mesoamerica, to how to wrap their gelt in foil. Taste, touch, history, mysticism, and science are all called upon to make coherent the relationship between chocolate, ecology, and Judaism.

Purim Party: An Eden Village All-Camp Program

by Maya Havusha
Eden Village Camp
The idea behind this program was to bring Purim to life in the middle of summer- a completely unexpected and ridiculously silly idea.The main goal for camp programming is always have fun, but just beneath that is our responsibility to educate our campers and create connections between Judaism, social justice, environmentalism and help them discover who they are (and who they want to be) in this big wild world. This program offers space for all of this! Campers will be split into small groups and have to overcome challenges placed before them, just like Esther did many years ago and begin to think about how they honor themselves, how they care for those around them, and how they stand up for what they believe in.

Taking Root

by Jared Kaminsky
Shoresh
This event is Shoresh?s 4th annual fundraiser celebrating our ten year anniversary. We gathered over 400 people to learn about our organization and our impact while enjoying delicious food in community. Our internal goal was to raise money to support our efforts, introduce new community members to our organization, and honour the many people who have been involved over the years.
Age(s):

Farm to Friday Nosh:pitality Shabbat

by Amanda Herring
OneTable
Shabbat is a time to sit and enjoy good food and good company, sourcing your food intentionally can bring a new level of mindful gratitude to your dinner table. It can also be delicious and filling! Shabbat rituals can be adapted to be relevant to your life, and the season. Local urban farms are doing amazing work in the D.C. area and our Jewish values teach us to support their work in any way we can. You can replicate this celebration at your Shabbats by thinking sustainably and seasonally, and reaching out to local farms.
Age(s):

Tu B’Shvat Youth Seders

by Daniella Aboody
Wilderness Torah
In the tradition of the Kabbalists (16th century mystics of Tsfat, Israel), we gather in the forest to create an experiential Tu B'Shvat seder (ceremony) that connects us to the trees and the elements, and we are taken on a journey from the physical world to the spiritual world. This oral tradition within Judaism encourages us to open ourselves to the mystery, wonder and creativity that this time of renewal and rebirth brings. During the seder, we delight in experiencing and tasting of p'ri ha-etz (the fruit of the trees) and celebrate the season together through the five senses, movement, mindfulness, ritual, and Tu B'Shvat teachings.

Naamah and the Plants

by Rebecca Remis
Eden Village West
Before the flood while Noah was readying the animals, a midrash says his wife Naamah was collecting seeds and plants. Through this lens, we'll explore plant life cycles, seed saving, and Jewish ideas of sustainability.

Celebrating Jewish Foodways: Cultural Preservation through Agriculture and Cuisines of the Diaspora

by Hannah Slipakoff
Jewish Farm School
This program is a facilitated conversation and recipe sampling focusing on culinary traditions across the Jewish diaspora. Emphasizing the significance of diversity in the diasporic food cannon, participants will have the opportunity to share life stories, explore cookbooks from around the world, and learn about local crop seasonality. Optional components include on-site farm tour and a cooking class. This curricula can be adapted depending on local crop availability/harvest.
Age(s):

Clearing Out the Old to Make Room for the New: A Passover Tradition

by Elizabeth Kaplan
JCC of Greater Boston Discovery Club
This program has been implemented as part of a 9-week series called Fantastic Farmers that meets for one hour per week at Newton Community Farm. The farm is a non-profit community farm located next door to the JCC that strives to benefit the community by providing locally grown produce through a CSA, educating the public about sustainable agriculture, and preserving Newton?s last working farm as a historic site and valuable open space.
Age(s):