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Hazon Educational Library: Workshop

A Hanukkah Dilemma: Dairy Making, Judith and the Dairy Industry

by Liana Rothman
Isabella Freedman
Three-fold workshop, which involves delving into the history of dairy on Hanukkah, making cheese and butter, and a discussion about the dairy industry and striving towards greater ethical consumption under capitalism, under the lens of our environmental crisis.
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Exploring Do it Yourself Judaism: Crafting Hand Dipped Beeswax Shabbat Candles

by Aliza Heeren
Eden Village Camp
In this program, participants explore the intention of Shabbat and the traditional and modern meaning and purpose of lighting Shabbat candles. Participants learn about the value of making Jewish ritual objects by hand, and get a small taste of the exciting world of bees!

Sephirot Ha’Omer: Oracle Cards

by Chelsea Taxman
Eden Village Camp
Allow intuition to guide you. Explore what resonates for you. Leave behind what does not resonate. Ultimately, the oracle cards are you ? your connection, intuition and interpretation.
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Mikveh: Jewish Ritual Immersion in Living Waters

by Sarah Julia Seldin
Jewish Farmer Network
This program leads participants in mikveh, Jewish ritual immersion, in a spring-fed stream.
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The First Cheese

by Cole Siegel
Isabella Freedman
Participants will learn to make ricotta cheese from fresh goat milk, while digging into various Jewish and secular texts, guided by the question: ?Why do we eat dairy on this holiday??
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Fire Building – Even if its Raining

by Ren Feldman
Eden Village Camp
This program is an introduction to fire building in the rain. Participants will learn about fires and learn to how safely and efficiently build a fire. Students will leave with an understanding of renewable and nonrenewable resources and the connection between Judaism and fires.

Weaving Community

by Ashley Davenport
Abundance Farm / Gan Keshet Preschool
Traditionally, weaving has deep roots in the Jewish culture. The craft of weaving is one of the 39 crafts that the Jewish people used to create the Mishkan (tabernacle) in the desert. Weaving, and many of the actions associated with weaving are mentioned specifically in the 39 Melachot, the list of labor forbidden on Shabbat. Although many of the traditional Jewish weaving techniques have been lost to exile, modern day ritual objects are often still made from woven materials, including challah covers, kippot and tallis. Looking back, history shows us that the nomadic Israelites used what fibers they had on hand, such as camel, goat, and sheep, to create their clothing and dwellings. These ancestral methods were simple. Using this simplicity as inspiration, the loom for this project is crafted from sturdy cardboard, the warp is made using cotton string, and the weft consists of long pieces of recycled fabric. Simplicity is often key in introducing new textile art projects to preschool age children. These projects are multifaceted and engaging to young minds, integrating core skill sets such as language and literacy development through oral storytelling, problem solving, pattern recognition, and fine motor development.

Divine Dyeing: How to harness the holiness of color through natural dyeing

by Mira Menyuk
Pearlstone Center
This program is an interactive color exploration through natural dyeing. Participants will learn about the symbolism and holiness associated with certain colors in Judaism, specifically the blue of tekhelet that is found in Tzitzit. They will also learn how to harvest and use different parts of plants to create their own dye and take home a self-dyed bookmark.

Sukkot, the Jewish Earth Day

by Darya Watnick
Edlavitch DC JCC
This program is designed to engage families with young children with the holiday of Sukkot and the festival?s connection to nature and the environment. Through stories, activities and arts & crafts, families will begin to develop a relationship to the rituals and traditions of Sukkot and think about their own connection to the natural world.

Degel – What we stand for

by Eli Weinbach
Hazon
Everyone has things they stand for and qualities they value. Grounding ourselves in the Biblical texts about Tribal flags the Midrash there, we will use flags as an opportunity to think about what symbols we can use to describe ourselves and what we value. Participants will learn about themselves and get to make their own flags that serve to unify what they stand for with where they came from.

Farm Infusions: Eco-spa

by Ilana Unger
Pearlstone Center
This program is an interactive hands on activity that connects participants to the ?essence? of Jewish earth based connection. Participants will have the opportunity to harvest locally grown herbs on the Pearlstone campus, infuse those herbs collected and create a homemade hand salve and/or lip balm and learn why this is a Jewish practice. Participants will leave with an understanding that everything is connected, and that the process of infusion connects us to the heart of caring for ourselves and the earth.

Shrinking Our Waste:Solar-Powered Shrinky Dinks

by Margot Sands
Ekar Farm
This program is an interactive introduction to the environmental Jewish value of Bal Tashchit, not destroying or wasting valuable resources. Participants will have the opportunity to explore creative ways we can reduce our carbon footprint by reducing and reusing everyday materials through a solar-oven baked shrinky dink project.

Havdallah Candle Making

by Danielle Smith
Eden Village Camp
This program is an introduction to Havdallah and DIY candle making. Participants will learn about a Havdallah candle and leave with their own candle. Students will leave with an understanding of what renewable resources are.
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Pickling and Food Justice

by Rachel Aronson
Hazon
This program provides an introduction to pickling and an overview of food justice issues. Participants will leave with a jar of pickles and knowledge of the pickling process, and with deeper insight into the importance of local food and workers' rights in the food system.

Turn, Turn, Turn: A Jewish Calendar Garden Mosaic

by Anika Rice
Urban Adamah
Any Jewish farm, school, community center or garden can use this document to either create a calendar garden with the community or to lead interactive educational programs that situate the holiday and season in Jewish cycles of time. This document gives an overview of the mosaic design process. It does not give detailed instructions for mosaics; seek this out elsewhere if you are not familiar with outdoor mosaics.