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Topic: Vegetarian

ejjeh

Recipe: Ejjeh (Edgeh)

This recipe comes to us from 2019 Hazon Food Conference Presenter Susan Barocas. These pancake-like omelets are full of flavor from the green onions, herbs and allspice. Cooked in olive oil, they are traditionally served during Hanukkah in Syrian communities, although ejjeh are tasty and satisfying year round when you will find them at street stands throughout the Mid East. There are many variations including with grated potatoes (Syrian ejjeh batata) or zucchini (ejjeh kusa). Ejjeh are usually served stuffed into pita or flatbread with pickled vegetables, cucumbers and fresh tomatoes. Makes eight 3-inch patties Ingredients 4 large eggs 6 tbsp scallions, green and white parts chopped small 4 tbsp parsley 3-4 tbsp mint, dill and/or cilantro, chopped small ½ cup chickpea flour 1 tsp ground allspice 1 tsp salt Ground black pepper to taste ½ cup pure olive oil Preparation In a large bowl, beat the eggs, then add all the ingredients except the olive oil. Mix well. Cooking Heat the oil in a large skillet at medium temperature. The oil is ready when a drop of water or batter sizzles in it. For each edgeh, drop a heaping tablespoon of batter into the hot oil. Flatten slightly with […]

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Recipe: Homemade Cheese (Paneer)

This recipe comes to us from 2019 Hazon Food Conference Presenter Regina Mosenkis. Recipe from What to Eat for How You Feel: The New Ayurvedic Kitchen by Divya Alter (Rizzoli, 2017) Paneer is freshly made, soft cheese or curd; it is the simplest kind of unfermented cheese and, really, the best cheese to eat. The quality and freshness of the milk will determine the quality of the paneer. You must use whole milk, as the higher the fat-content of the milk, the richer the cheese. Raw milk is the best; low-fat or skim milk are worse, resulting in very little or no cheese. Different curdling agents will produce different types of paneer. The best curdling agent from an Ayurvedic perspective is fresh yogurt or buttermilk; the next best is fresh lime juice. You may also use fresh lemon juice, citric acid crystals dissolved in water, or sour whey from a previous batch of curd cheese. Each curdling agent gives a slightly different texture and flavor of the curd. That is why paneer could be somewhat unpredictable; how it turns out depends on the quality of the milk, sourness of the curdling agent, the temperature, etc. Do not panic! The more […]

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Recipe: Olive Oil Poached Broccoli Stems and Chickpeas on Ricotta Toast

This recipe comes to us from 2019 Hazon Food Conference Presenter Liz Rueven. Recipe adapted from Cooking with Scraps; Turn your Peels, Cores, Rinds and Stems into Delicious Meals by Lindsay-Jean Hard, 2018 Yield: Serves 3-4 with a single slice of toast or makes appetizers for a small crowd This recipe is dairy or may be made pareve/vegan with dairy-free spreadable cheese like Daiya Ingredients 2 heads broccoli, stems (large and small) and leaves included ⅓-½ cup EVOO plus more for drizzling 1 can (15 oz.) chickpeas, drained and rinsed. Consider saving the liquid, called aquafaba*, for other recipes. ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice ½ teaspoon fine-grain sea salt Thick slices of crusty bread (use baguette if making this as an appetizer; use larger artisanal loaf, if serving to 3-4 friends). 1 container (16 oz.) whole milk ricotta Red pepper flakes for garnish (optional) Preparation Using a paring knife, remove the tough outermost layer of the broccoli stems, reserving all of the leaves. Chop the stems into roughly chickpea-size pieces. Heat ⅓ cup olive oil in a medium-sized saucepan over medium heat. Add the broccoli to pan. If the pieces aren’t fully covered, add the remaining olive oil. Cook […]

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bumuelos resized square

Recipe: Bumuelos

This recipe comes to us from 2019 Hazon Food Conference Presenter Susan Barocas. This is the only bumuelos recipe I’ve ever used, dating back over 50 years to growing up in Denver and modified only slightly since then. However, there are many versions online, in books and in people’s kitchens. Bumuelos are sometimes called the Sephardic or Turkish beignet, but nearly every cuisine and culture has some version of a deep fried, syrup-soaked, white flour dough perfect for Hanukkah. In Latin America, they are often called buñuelos and in India, jalebi, while in Morocco they are called sfenj. Syrian Jews make zalabieh, Persian Jews zoloobiah and for Iraqi Jews it’s zangoola. Italian Jews serve anise-flavored frittelle di Hanukkah. No matter the name, all are a good excuse to enjoy a sweet fried treat! Makes about 3 dozen Ingredients Dough 2 envelopes dry yeast 1 1/3 cups warm water 1 egg, well beaten ½ teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon oil 3 cups + 3 tablespoons flour Oil for deep frying Cinnamon to sprinkle Syrup: 1 cup sugar 1 cup honey 1 cup water 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 stick cinnamon Preparation To make the dough, dissolve the yeast in 1/3 cup warm water […]

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apple honey bundt cake

Recipe: Apple Honey Bundt Cake

Want a bigger taste?  Join us at the Rosh Hashanah Retreat! Apple Honey Bundt Cake This recipe & photo come from Allrecipes.com Prep time: 20 minutes Cook time: 55 minutes Total time: 1 hour and 15 minutes Servings: 12 pieces Ingredients 1 cup white sugar 1 cup vegetable oil 2 eggs 3/4 cup honey 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon ground allspice 3 apples – peeled, cored and shredded 3/4 cup chopped walnuts Instructions Preheat the oven to 325 degrees F (165 degrees C).  Grease and flour a 9-inch Bundt pan or 2 loaf pans. In a large bowl, stir together the sugar and oil. Beat in the eggs until light, then stir in the honey and vanilla.  Combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and allspice; stir into the batter just until moistened.  Fold in the apples and nuts.  Transfer batter to prepared pan or pans. Note: If you’re baking the cake in loaf pans, reduce baking time to 45 minutes, or until a tester inserted in the center of each pan comes out clean. Bake Bundt […]

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Fig and Rosemary Cookies (with Gluten Free Option)

Want a bigger taste?  Join us this summer at the Hazon Food Conference! Ayala Sherman, adapted from food52 Ingredients 4 cups flour (1to1 GF baking flour) 1 tsp salt 2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil (or melted coconut oil) 2 egg yolks – room temperature 1 cup butter – room temperature 1 cup sugar 3 tablespoons chopped rosemary 1 cup chopped black mission figs Directions Cover figs with warm water until plump, approximately 20 minutes. Drain water and roughly chop figs to bite sized pieces. In a separate bowl, massage chopped rosemary with sugar. In a separate bowl whisk together salt with flour. In a standing mixer with a paddle attachment, beat the butter for 2-3 minutes to increase in volume. Add sugar mixture and continue beating for another 3-5 minutes. Add the egg yolks to butter/sugar mixture. Slowly drizzle in the olive oil and continue beating for another 1-2 minutes. Add flour/salt mixture to the wet ingredients. Fold in figs. Mix by hand with spatula Place dough on work space and knead together and separate into two flat discs. Refrigerate for 1-2 hours. Scoop using a mini ice cream scooper. Bake at 325 F convection (12 minutes) or 350 […]

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